Locust Bean Gum
Title: Locust Bean Gum
Additional Names: Carob flour; Johannisbrotmehl
Trademarks: Arobon
Literature References: The ground kernel endosperms of tree pods of Ceratonia siliqua L., Leguminosae (St. John's bread). Consists of proteins such as albumins, globulins, prolamins, gluteline; carbohydrates such as reducing sugars, sucrose, dextrins, pentosans; ash; fat; crude fiber; moisture. Refs: Plaut et al., Bull. Res. Counc. Isr. 3, No. 11, 129 (1953), C.A. 48, 5397 (1954); Griffiths, Manuf. Chem. 20, 321 (1949); Coit, Econ. Bot. 5, 82 (1951). Use as coffee, chocolate, cocoa substitute, extender: W. A. Meer, Manuf. Confect. 59, 41 (1979). Caffeine, theobromine content: W. J. Craig, T. T. Nguyen, J. Food Sci. 49, 302 (1984). Review: F. Rol in Industrial Gums, R. L. Whistler, Ed. (Academic Press, New York, 2nd ed., 1973) pp 323-337.
Properties: Yellow-green color, is odorless and tasteless, but acquires a leguminous taste when boiled in water.
Use: Stabilizer, thickener, and binder in foods and cosmetics. Coffee, chocolate, cocoa substitute. Sizing and finishing agent in textiles. As fiber bonding in paper manuf. Drilling mud additive.
Therap-Cat: Adsorbent-demulcent.

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