Yeast
Title: Yeast
Literature References: The moist, living cells of a fungus or fungi whose usual and dominant growth form is unicellular. The term yeast is not one with an exact botanical meaning, see Henrici's Molds, Yeasts and Actinomycetes (New York, 1947) p 264 sqq. Normally produces alcoholic fermentation in fluids contg sugar. Moist yeast is usually combined with a starchy or absorbent base and comes on the market in the form of white or yellowish-white, soft, easily broken masses of a characteristic, slightly sour odor. Description of a modern process of manuf: Schultz, Swift, US 2717837 (1955 to Standard Brands).
Properties: The dried yeast of pharmacopoeias consists of the dry cells of any suitable strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyen, Saccharomytaceae or Candida utilis (Hanneberg) Lodder and Kreger-Van Rij, Cryptococcaceae (torula yeast), usually obtained as a by-product from the brewing of beer made from an extract of cereal grains and hops. The yeast cells are washed free of beer and dried, and may be debittered. These yeasts are commonly known as "Brewer's Dried Yeast" and "Debittered Brewer's Dried Yeast." Dried yeast may be obtained also by growing suitable strains of yeast, using media other than those required for the production of beer, and under appropriate environmental conditions. The yeast thus obtained is commonly known as "Primary Dried Yeast." Dried yeast that fulfills pharmacopeal requirements contains not less than 40% protein, and, in each gram, the equivalent of not less than 0.12 mg of thiamine hydrochloride, 0.04 mg of riboflavin, and 0.25 mg of nicotinic acid. It occurs as yellowish-white to weak yellowish-orange flakes, granules or powder, having an odor indicative of the type. It is inactive in fermenting power.
Use: Moist yeast in baking bread, brewing; producing alcohol by fermentation of sugar, molasses, and cereals; as a source of vitamins. Dried yeast as a source of vitamins; in baking.
Therap-Cat: Source of protein and vitamin B complex.
Therap-Cat-Vet: Dietary source of B vitamins.

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